Signs that the child is ready to stop using diapers

  • Shows curiosity about using the toilet.
  • She/He wants to go with parents (or caregivers) to the bathroom.
  • Begins to mention when she/he has a dirty diaper.
  • Stop what she/he are doing when are “filling” the diaper.
  • It has the autonomy to fulfill a simple order (ex: Stay seated).

    Does anyone remember any more?

Some diapers myths

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In the case of a rash, it is not possible to use wipes on the diaper change and it is good to always wash with water

When there is a rash, or a redness, erythema, fungal or bacterial infection, in the diaper region, there is always someone who recommends that the skin should be washed with only water on all diaper changes. Like all generalist recommendations, this is one more that can screw all up.

Think about it: what would your skin look like if you take 6 to 8 baths a day? Water as harmless as it may seem can lead to excessive dryness of the skin. This, if in a healthy skin already requires extra hydration measures, if on already injured skin can potentiate the appearance of other problems associated with the loss of integrity of the skin barrier which, due to excessive dryness. It loses the fat layer (sebum / first barrier), loses the layer of dead cells (cornea / second barrier), thus become more exposed to viruses/fungi/bacteria, etc. Therefore, and in any affection of the diaper area, the most important is to minimize contact of the skin with stool and urine, either using more absorbent diapers (called “dry diaper”) or increasing the rate of exchange (ideally immediately after each use of the diaper). It is also important to ensure proper hygiene, removing all debris, and, finally, providing the skin with the ideal conditions for rapid regeneration.

Disposable Diapers Cause Allergies

In theory, any and all substances can cause allergy on a susceptible skin. And here we can include the metal of the reusable snap fasteners, the detergent impregnated in the cotton of it, the elastic ( from both disposable and reusable), etc…

Diapers… Diapers…

The universe of diapers is something that can not be missed by any new family. Starting with the quantity, types, models, environmental and economic impact, something as simple as a diaper, can take hours of sleep and rest to the future parents and have a real impact on the health and well-being of the baby.

Let’s go, step by step…

fralda

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Amount:
A newborn can need between 8 and 12 diapers a day.
Further forward decreases slightly but never drops more than 5 a day until about 2/3 years.

Types and Models:
There are disposable (use and throw away after it) diapers and reusable (wear, wash and reuse) diapers.
In the disposables there are those of fast absorption, those of great capacity for longer periods (ex: night), the ones of absorption by the fibers (less effective to keep your baby dry), the ones of polymers (better at isolate the humidity), the biodegradable ones, the specific ones to use in water (ex: swimming pool, sea), the diapers of adhesives and pull-ups like underwear (that help in the transition to leave the diapers).
In the reusable ones there are the one-size adjustable ones (accompanying the child’s growth), the traditional ones in various sizes, the pocket ones (they have absorbents that are inserted in an inner pocket), those integrated with bathing suits for use in water (ex: pool, sea, …), etc …

Environmental and Economic Impact:
Obviously, non-biodegradable disposables are the ones which increase the most our ecological footprint by far. The practicality is paid with environmental impact. Halfway there are biodegradable disposables that, while not 100% degradable, always relieve our ecological conscience.
The footprint gets smaller with reusable ones, of course. However, we must not forget the necessary washes, the pollution of water with detergents, the consumption of electricity, etc … right?
Economically speaking, every option has a big impact on the family budget. The reusable ones require a higher initial investment that is monetized later (and especially when the second child arrives), the disposables require a regular and more or less constant expenditure over 2 to 3 years.

And myths related with diapers… Do you know some? Look up for our next post… 😉